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How speeding influences car crashes

| Oct 29, 2019 | Uncategorized

Who hasn’t been frustrated by running late for work or a social engagement? It’s easy to feel the need to make up that time by speeding. However, speeding is one of the most dangerous driving behaviors there is.

Excessive speed is a factor in more than one-quarter of all fatal car crashes and frequently occurs simultaneously with other risky driving acts like drinking and driving or not wearing a seatbelt.

Is speeding worth it?

The risks of speeding outweigh the benefits of speeding. Someone driving 10 miles per hour on a 15-mile drive is saving just minutes. You don’t see significant time savings from speeding unless you’re taking a long trip.

Research shows that time savings from driving 10 miles over the speed limit doesn’t occur unless you’re taking a 500-mile trip. For reference, 500 miles is slightly more than the distance from Chicago to Minneapolis. Speeding on your 15-minute commute is likely to only make you slightly-less late to work. If you’re running late on a short drive, you’re better off keeping to the speed limit.

Consequences of speeding

What makes speeding so dangerous is that not only does it cause you to take longer to stop, it increases the likelihood for you to lose control. Of course, a greater speed increases the severity of an accident which can also increase the severity of injuries to the vehicle’s passengers.

Speeding can be expensive, too. Having a lead foot can decrease your vehicle’s fuel efficiency which can lead you to spending more money on gas. Law enforcement can also ticket and fine you for speeding and can also affect the cost of your insurance premium.

Avoiding speeding

There are many things beyond your control on the road, but your speed is not one of them. If you know that there will be heavy traffic or bad weather along your route, plan to leave earlier. By not speeding, you help ensure your safety and the safety of others on the road as well as saving you money.